Washburn Mercury Series Tonewood

This is my recently acquired Washburn Mercury Series Tonewood electric guitar. Its a limited edition run from the mid nineties, with a mahogony body and a maple neck. As far as I can tell its entirely stock with its original coil tap on the bridge pickup controlled by the push-pull tone knob.

As you can see above the colour of the wood depends heavily upon the lighting. The final two photos, which were taken in the shade, give the best impression of the instruments real colour.

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Fixing problems with encrypted removable media

If you have plug encrypted removable media into a recent GNU/Linux distribution it will probably try to automount it for you.

So far, so hoopy.

However a recurring class of bugs in the hot plug logic is failure to tear down the encrypted device mapper when the media is removed without unmounting it first.

It results in a message something like this:

Error unlocking device: cryptsetup exited with exit code 5: Device udisks-luks-uuid-d9fb9d0d-74e6-49b1-94d3-7edc083f04c0-uid80377 already exists.

Naturally this is a bug in your distribution but it is one that tends to regress as the desktop stack is developed so knowing how to workaround will do you no harm at all.

I generally use:

sudo cryptsetup luksClose udisks-luks-uuid-d9fb9d0d-74e6-49b1-94d3-7edc083f04c0-uid80377

Note: gnome-shell-3.2 will prompt you for a password but doesn’t issue an error message if the automount fails. If you want to see the error message (and hence the name of the mapping) open the file manager and try to mount the encrypted partititon from there instead.

Although I couldn’t really be bothered you could easily write a script to automatically identify encrypted device mapping that aren’t being used and undo them by getting a script to look at the output of ls -al /dev/mapper. Probably it would be best to look for devices that have a mapping but are not mounted.

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