tintdrum – tintamp’s junior stablemate

For some time now I’ve been playing with constructing my own digital modeller.

By and large I’ve deliberately kept the scope of the project to be a make a practice tool (rather than a studio effect) in order to try an keep things achievable. The ultimate aim is to make a device that you use like an amPlug (or iRig for iPhone) to practice with. More exactly it is a battery operated “thing” that allows you practice without any wires except those joining the guitar to your ears.

I’m working in phases of very limited scope so that I can lose interest in the project whilst still having achieved something and there’s still a long way to go before I can call it a modeller. Nevertheless since Christmas I’ve been able to move from playing with software in the PC to playing with something real.

STM32F4-Discovery running an early version of tintdrum
The above is my recently acquired STM32F4-Discovery board running tintdrum, a fixed function groove machine designed to use like a metronome but with a stronger groove. The idea is that this type of drum machine is a vital component of a digital practice tool so tintamp will definitely have to have one when its finished. However it is actually useful enough to be a separate thing in its own right. Something I can put in a box and call “done”

The board above is running my own drum machine software. You can tell can’t you? Until last week all it was able to do was plug in and it started playing drums via the headphone socket at the bottom… it played a really basic 4/4, kick, snare, kick, snare beat (plus hi-hat)… at exactly 100 beats per minutes… and that’s it.

This week however I’ve been able to extend it to flash an LED on the beat (a vital feature in a practice tool) and also been able to rig up a tap tempo button. This means its starting to feel real. That said I still need to implement controls to change the groove and volume. I’d also like to extend the drum machine code to include humanization to stop is sounding quite so start.

Nevertheless the journey from PC to real hardware has begun. Bon voyage.

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